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Reversing an earlier preference, Arlington Heights village board members indicated Monday they will determine to prohibit the sale of recreational marijuana inside the town’s borders, arguing a ban would preserve the village’s image as a family members-oriented neighborhood.

Six members of the nine-particular person elected panel mentioned they would vote to outlaw pot sales, following the path of towns like Park Ridge and Extended Grove that have also selected to opt out. Other folks, like Buffalo Grove, Wheeling, Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates, have decided to permit cannabis shops as soon as the state law legalizing adult use requires impact Jan. 1.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Though a six-three straw poll was taken throughout Arlington Heights’ committee of the entire meeting Monday evening, a vote on a formal ordinance is set to be taken Monday, Nov. four.

It marked the second time Arlington Heights’ elected officials talked about no matter if to permit recreational marijuana sales, immediately after a majority mentioned they have been open to it throughout an Aug. 13 meeting. But due to the fact then, some trustees mentioned they’ve changed their minds, questioning if income estimates of up to $500,000 a year for village coffers would be realized.

“The residents produced clear our brand and reputation should not be traded for income,” Trustee John Scaletta mentioned. “This is not the finest way to boost income. As soon as we permit cannabis sales, we cannot place the genie back in the bottle.”

Scaletta and Bert Rosenberg have been amongst 5 board members at the August discussion to express a willingness to permit marijuana sales by dispensaries.

Rosenberg, viewed as the board’s economic guru, agreed that income could go to towns like nearby Buffalo Grove, but he also mentioned there would be hidden expenses to permitting sales.

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On the other side, these in favor of permitting pot organizations argued the quantity of income, though modest, was substantial.

The village employees mentioned neighborhood pot taxes would translate to a 1.five% lower in the village’s portion of a home tax bill for a resident, or about $15 a year for a $300,000 residence. A single marijuana shop could produce the similar quantity of income as a medium-sized automobile dealership, officials mentioned.

“It really is OK to have a racetrack exactly where individuals gamble and come in on the train from communities all about us, and have liquor licenses up and down the streets of all our neighborhoods,” mentioned Trustee Jim Tinaglia, who voted in favor of sales with Wealthy Baldino and Mary Beth Canty. “And it really is OK to stroll across the street to Buffalo Grove … but it really is not OK to sell it and get the tax dollars in our town? I believe that is crazy.”

Most of these who attended the board meeting Monday evening have been pleased with the outcome, applauding immediately after the vote was taken. It came immediately after an hour and a half of public comment throughout which practically 3-quarters of these who spoke — some wearing “opt out” T-shirts — urged the board to ban sales.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        



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